Vector Population dynamics

Population dynamics of Armigeres subalbatus

Population dynamics of Phlebotomins

 

Population dynamics of Armigeres subalbatus


In urban situation, controlling nuisance-causing mosquitoes like Armigeres subalbatus is necessary because people perceive impact of vector control operation with the relief from mosquito bites. This would help to involve them in any vector control programmes. In view of this, information on the population dynamics of Armigeres subalbatus was generated in Pondicherry, where a filaria control demonstration project was launched. The density of adult population and the man-biting rate was higher during post monsoon period. Adults prefered to rest outdoors than in human dwellings and cattle sheds. Peak biting occured at dawn (0600-0800 h) and dusk (1700-1900 h). The species was exophagic and prefered to bite cattle. Since Ar. subalbatus was found breeding along with Cx. quinquefasciatus, which was the target species in the filariasis control programme, control measures carried out would give the collateral benefit of reducing this nuisance-causing mosquito.
 

Population dynamics of Phlebotomins


There were reports of kala-azar from the adjacent areas of Tamil Nadu and people moved frequently from these areas to Pondicherry and vice-versa. In view of the risk of outbreak of Kala-azar in Pondicherry because of the prevalence of Phlebotomus papatasi and P. argentipes, information were generated on the population dynamics of these species for formulating control strategy to meet any eventuality. The average indoor resting density of Ph. papatasi was low in the month of May and high in October and a positive correlation existed between rainfall and relative density. Growth rate of Ph. papatasi was maximum in rainy season. Ph. papatasi was endophilic whereas P. argentipes preferred outdoors for resting. Ph. argentipes was found to be zoophilic. The biting activity was seen throughout the night, reaching a peak at 0100 h in Ph. papatasi and 0200 h in Ph. argentipes. Autogeny was observed in P. papatasi that emerged from the larvae fed on animal liver powder. The studies showed both the species were prevalent in large number and found to be anthropophilic. This suggested the necessity for establishment of a surveillance system for monitoring the situation.

 

 

 

Last Updated on : 07/04/2014